The Surreal Glamour Composite

When compositing a glamour portrait, there is of course no rule that says you must always use a realistic photographic background. Often, a plain, simple background can be used to really draw our attention to the model. In this example, a white background was placed behind the model (the beautiful Priscilla Martin of Singapore), and a black layer with a gradient mask was placed over the white layer. A drop shadow was also added:

Priscilla giving that inscrutable look that I love. She would make a great poker player.

Priscilla giving that inscrutable look that I love. She would make a great poker player.

The glamour composite can also be taken into the realm of the surreal. By surreal, I mean it would not be possible to take the image here on Earth. Another name for this category is "fantasy portrait." The danger here is the same problem faced in all glamour composites: if it is too weird, colorful or fantastic, then our attention is drawn away from the model and into the background. Again, this is exactly opposite of what we want. Here is a surreal glamour portrait of the multi-talented and extraordinary Stella Seet, also of Singapore:

Stella striking a very graphic pose. This leaves space for the window.

Stella striking a very graphic pose. This leaves space for the window.

Here again the same conflict presents itself: we want an interesting background, but at the same time we want the model to have center stage. In this example, the floor is very busy, and the original wall was bright green and grey. In order to tone down the background, I converted the entire scene to black and white. Likewise, the red window frame was desaturated. I decided to leave a hint of color in the sky for added interest.

If your eye stays mainly on Stella, then I have achieved my vision. If your eye focuses primarily on the window, then this composite should be considered a candidate for a serious re-edit!