An Interesting Retouch for Studio Glamour - Part 2

This is a continuation of the series about replacing the seamless background of a studio shot with a background made in Photoshop. Let us begin by showing the initial retouched image of Andrelica:

Andrelica looks great, but the grey seamless has marks on it.

Andrelica looks great, but the grey seamless has marks on it.

In this example, I wanted to use the bottom part of this original image because it has a nice shadow. However, I did not want the scuff marks on the paper to show. The following image is the culmination of several steps.

First, I masked out the grey seamless then created a separate layer of Andrelica without the mask, as described in Part 1 of this series. Next I duplicated the layer with the mask, but deleted the mask. This layer is the middle layer. This layer was blurred (Filter -> Blur -> Gaussian Blur...) until the scuff marks were gone.

A new blank layer was created about the blurred layer, and filled with 50% grey (Edit -> Fill... -> 50% Grey). A white layer mask was added. Using the Rectangular Marquee Tool, and with the layer mask selected, a rectangle was drawn covering the bottom part of the image. This was filled with black to reveal the bottom part of the blurred image below.

Above this, another blank layer was created. Again using the Rectangular Marquee Tool, a rectangle was drawn just above the top edge of the blurred layer. This rectangle was filled with an orange color, Gaussian blurred and then the layer opacity was reduced to 60%.

Another blank layer was created as in the previous paragraph. This time the rectangle was drawn on the top of the image, down to the orange from the previous layer, and filled with deep blue. A white layer mask was added. With black set as the foreground color, the Gradient Tool was selected and a linear gradient was Shift-dragged from near the bottom of the blue rectangle to the bottom of the rectangular frame. Holding down the Shift key keeps your drag perfectly vertical. The bottom edge of the blue rectangle is now blurred. The layer opacity was lowered to 70%. This has the effect of letting some of the 50% grey layer below show through.

Above this, another blank layer was added, and black was added in a rectangular area at the top of the image, as in the previous paragraph. I actually used an image with stars, but black works fine. As before, use the Gradient Tool to Shift-drag on the mask from the black area to the bottom of its rectangular frame.

With the visibility of the top layer of Andrelica (the layer without the mask) turned off, the image looks like this. Notice that her hand is not blurred; the blurred hand was masked out because a blurred hand would interfere with the look of the final image.:

An interesting new background is starting to come together.

An interesting new background is starting to come together.

Above these layers, a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer was added. The Hue was set to 290, the Colorize box checked and the layer opacity lowered to 50%. Again, the visibility of the top layer of Andrelica has been turned off so you can see what is going on a little better:

The Hue/Saturation adjustment layer has the effect of unifying the color palette of the image.

The Hue/Saturation adjustment layer has the effect of unifying the color palette of the image.

If the visibility of the top layer is turned back on, it looks like this:

Finally, we can see Andrelica again.

Finally, we can see Andrelica again.

Even though we can still see a bit of the original shadow from the studio strobes, a drop shadow is needed to better unify Andrelica with the floor. As such, a drop shadow layer was created below her layer, using the same process described in Part 1. The layer opacity of the drop shadow layer was lowered to 70%. Our finished image looks like this:

Final.

Final.